torika bolatagici

Archive for November, 2009|Monthly archive page

The Other APT – Curated by Jenny Fraser – Now Showing

In Art Exhibitions, Contemporary Pacific Art, Pacific Islander Art in Australia on November 30, 2009 at 9:15 am
the other APT

the other APT

Following on from the successful show in 2006, this is an exhibition of alterNATIVE perspectives held in response to the 6th Asia Pacific Triennial at QAG and the QGOMA, in Queensland, Australia. the other APT features a range of artworks from Australian-based artists from various cultural backgrounds and artforms: Aboriginal, Torres Strait Islander, Australian South Sea Islander, Fijian, Maori, Tongan, Samoan, Vietnamese, Chinese, Filipino and more. launching online from December 1, 2009. Curated by Jenny Fraser.

http://www.cybertribe.culture2.org/theotherapt

(Finally – the wait is over! I am so thrilled to be a part of this show! Love love love your work Jenny!!! TBx)

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Annal Beads: Solo Show by Chantal Fraser opens Friday

In Art Exhibitions, Contemporary Pacific Art, Pacific Islander Art in Australia on November 30, 2009 at 4:10 am
Annal Beads:: Solo show by Chantal Fraser

Annal Beads:: Solo show by Chantal Fraser

OPENING:

6pm December 4 2009
Raw Space Galleries – 99 Melbourne St South Brisbane

The first solo exhibition by Brisbane based multi-media artist Chantal Fraser. Conjoining the annals of travel and tourism, this series shapes the parochial views of the tourist as subject.

A series of performative frames showcase a collection of neckpieces (Ula) from the artist’s Samoan family – gifts of significance, ceremony and value – alongside a collection of metallic beads thrown from the balconies of Bourbon St, New Orleans during Mardi Gras– an herogenous ritual that rewards the female tourist more beads on the exposing of breasts. Reinterpreting the significance of adornment the artist presents and plays with the disparate meanings of what it means to receive such objects from these heavily tourist promoted regions through flamboyancy, titillation and parody.

slapsista :: fly, unfurl and be free…

In Contemporary Performance, Hip Hop Research, Uncategorized on November 28, 2009 at 2:30 am

Body percusionist, educator, writer, Annalise Friend

Annalise is an awesome multi-talented woman, whom I was lucky enough to meet at the Big Island workshop at University of Wollongong last week. Check her website and blog and look out for her performances and workshops.

Big Ideas for a Big Island – Media Release

In Contemporary Pacific Art, Pacific Islander Art in Australia, Pacific Research and News on November 26, 2009 at 4:12 am
Big Island Workshop Participants

L-R, Torika Bolatagici, Joycelin Leahy, Jenny Fraser, Keren Ruki, Pam Zeplin

Critical workshop in Wollongong tests the waters on future directions for Pacific arts – By Maurice O’Riordan, Art Monthly Australia

A workshop intensive to share research and pool ideas related to the discussion and promotion of contemporary Pacific arts in Australia was this week hosted by the Centre for Asia Pacific Social Transformation Studies at Wollongong University.

Australia, the Big Island in relation to the Pacific, generally looks to New Zealand when seeking to represent contemporary Pacific arts practice. Artists from smaller Pacific islands may be granted the occasional look-in, the workshop suggested, while Australian-based Pacific content is largely appreciated as ‘decoration’, with an emphasis on community- and tradition-based performance.

Read more…

NEW STUDY ON VETERAN’S MENTAL HEALTH AND BRAIN INJURY

In PTSD on November 11, 2009 at 8:56 am

A new US study assesses the post-deployment health-related needs associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, and traumatic brain injury; examined the treatment capacity of the current health care system, and estimated the costs of providing quality health care to all US military members who need it. http://www.rand.org/multi/military/veterans/

>>>See also military families’ response
>>>What brain scans show: hidden injuries
>>>More comment

From the MAPW e-newsletter.

Victoria University of Wellington is seeking a Director for its Pacific Unit: Va’aomanū Pasifika

In Pacific Research and News, Uncategorized on November 3, 2009 at 4:21 am
Va'aomanu Pasifika

Va'aomanu Pasifika

The University currently offers a range of courses leading to majors in Pacific Studies and Samoan Studies in the BA degree at undergraduate level. The BA (Honours), and MA in Pacific Studies and the PhD in Pacific Studies are offered at postgraduate level.

The Director will provide academic leadership and strategic direction for Va’aomanū Pasifika. This position will enhance further the research culture, postgraduate development, and research-led teaching of Pacific Studies and Samoan Studies at Victoria University. The Director must also develop and maintain external networks and effective working relationships with Pacific communities and stakeholders.

Applicants should have a PhD and an excellent research and teaching profile. A background in social sciences and a proficiency in a Pacific language would be an advantage.

The appointment will be made at Associate Professor level.

Visit the VUW website >>

Taskforce checks on jobs recruiter

In Militarism in the Pacific, Pacific Research and News, PSMC recruitment in Fiji on November 2, 2009 at 9:52 pm

“A POLICE taskforce set up to look into allegations against former recruiter Timoci Lolohea is now collecting complaints from several police stations.

Members of the public have been asked to lodge official complaints against the former Meridian Services Agency Ltd recruiting agent. Lolohea was alleged to have defrauded thousands of men, including villagers, of what some believe totalled over $1million…”

Read more from the Fiji Times >>

Fiji recruiter returns home

In Militarism in the Pacific, Pacific Research and News, PSMC recruitment in Fiji on November 2, 2009 at 9:50 pm

“Mr Lolohea left the country in early March, 2005 to secure jobs for hundreds of workers, mainly drivers, while over 2000 others, who paid minimum fees of $150 each, waited expectedly for the call to work in oil rich Kuwait.

Many of the recruits, both skilled and unskilled, were from villages around the country and some gave fees of up to $300.

The recruitment drive fell through after the first group of Fijians working there was deported and soon after Mr Lolohea went ‘missing’.”

Read more at PACNEWS >>