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Archive for the ‘PTSD’ Category

// TO HELMAND AND BACK //

In Gender and Militarism in the Pacific, Masculinity, militarism, Militarism in the Pacific, Military History, PSMC recruitment in Fiji, PTSD on February 3, 2010 at 11:24 am
Derek Derenalagi

Derek Derenalagi

More than 2,000 Fijians are currently serving in the British forces, trading their palm-fringed Pacific islands for the battlefields of Afghanistan and Iraq. Why do they do it? For a passport out of poverty and to fight for the nation that once ruled them. Dan McDougall reports .

Read the full article…

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NEW STUDY ON VETERAN’S MENTAL HEALTH AND BRAIN INJURY

In PTSD on November 11, 2009 at 8:56 am

A new US study assesses the post-deployment health-related needs associated with post-traumatic stress disorder, major depression, and traumatic brain injury; examined the treatment capacity of the current health care system, and estimated the costs of providing quality health care to all US military members who need it. http://www.rand.org/multi/military/veterans/

>>>See also military families’ response
>>>What brain scans show: hidden injuries
>>>More comment

From the MAPW e-newsletter.

Parents of Soldier Who Killed Himself in Iraq Speak Out

In PTSD, US Military on October 27, 2009 at 10:05 pm
Chancellor Keesling

Chancellor Keesling

Gregg and Jannett Keesling are the parents of Chancellor Keesling, a US soldier who took his own life on June 19th of this year. Chancellor was on his second tour of duty in Iraq. During his first deployment, he suffered mental health issues so severe he was placed on suicide watch. After getting back to the United States, Chancellor had turned down a bonus offer to return to Iraq in the hopes he wouldn’t be redeployed. But he was called back in May. One month later, he took his own life. Since Chancellor’s death, Gregg and Jannett Keesling have yet to receive a letter of condolence from President Obama. After making inquiries, they discovered that this was not because of an oversight. Instead, it’s because of a longstanding US policy to deny presidential condolence letters to the families of soldiers who take their own lives.

Read more at Democracy Now! >>